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The central slip is part of the extensor tendon that inserts into the middle bone of the finger and assists with straightening the finger. When the central slip is injured, this can mean that the tendon has ruptured or that the bone has fractured at the point where the tendon connects, and you may find you are unable to straighten your finger. Without the central slip working, your finger may develop a deformity called a boutonniere.

Dependent on how severe your injury, it may be treated conservatively or require surgery to repair to the damaged structures, followed by splinting and an exercise programme.

How your injury is treated initially i.e. surgical or conservative management, will impact your on-going rehabilitation plan, so please check with your treating therapist before commencing any of the following exercise programmes; you may have to keep your finger straight for a period of time before starting any exercises or movement.

*BEFORE COMMENCING ANY OF THE FOLLOWING ADVICE OR EXERCISES, PLEASE DISCUSS WITH YOUR HAND THERAPIST TO CONFIRM IF IT IS APPROPRIATE FOR YOUR INJURY/OPERATION*

Link for Conservative management of Central Slip Injury:

Central slip injury

Link for Early Active Motion following a Central Slip Tendon Surgical Repair:

SAM week 1